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Vanguard Learning College

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Learning Challenge Grants

Learning College Challenge Grants Applied Instructional Technology--II
Moraine Valley Community College
Division of Academic Affairs-Vision 2000

Grant Resource Guide
1999-2000 Academic Year

Background
Challenged by Terry O'Banion, the keynote speaker at Moraine Valley Community College's August 1996 in-service program, the college's faculty and staff initiated dialogue focused on increasing innovation and interactivity in the teaching and learning process. In October 1996, the vice president of Academic Affairs introduced the Vision 2000 initiative, which further articulated the college's commitment to the Learning College Model as a learner-centered approach to providing greater opportunities for empowering students to navigate their own learning paths. The Vision 2000 goal was to provide support for the creative curriculum delivery efforts that were already in evidence among faculty and departments, to encourage further innovation by faculty in all subject areas, and to invite faculty to infuse technology into learning modules and courses.

The Learning Challenge Grant Program was implemented at Moraine Valley Community College in the 1996-97 academic year to facilitate progress toward the Vision 2000 efforts. The program awards support, resources and funding to individual faculty members and/or teams for the purpose of developing creative and compelling approaches to the teaching and learning process. The results of the Learning Challenge Grant Program have been exciting and substantive, including the introduction in the fall of 1998 of Moraine Valley's Virtual College. With the implementation of the Virtual College in the fall 1998 semester, Moraine Valley joined the vanguard of institutions providing Internet-based instruction to students.

In November 1998, the Illinois Community College Board selected the Moraine Valley Community College Learning Challenge Grant Program to receive its 1998 Award for Teaching and Learning Excellence.

Invitation
The Division of Academic Affairs is eager to continue its support of learning-centered instruction and expand the use of technology for teaching and learning. For these reasons a primary focus of the Learning Challenges for 2000 is on the application of instructional technology. You are invited to make application for an Applied Instructional Technology Program grant.

The goal of this effort is to incorporate technology into a course currently taught in a traditional "low-tech" fashion. This might involve the introduction of internet access, course Web pages, simulation of processes, multimedia demonstrations, automated course management, online student evaluation, etc. In other words, any innovation involving an application of instructional technologies.

A number of qualified proposals will be accepted. Each project accepted will result in the participant's eligibility for a stipend of several hundred dollars, proportional to the work required for this technology application.

Participation
Faculty anxious to participate in this project are asked to present a letter of interest (two-page maximum) to the vice president of Academic Affairs. Deadline: Dec. 1999. The selection criteria for this project will be based upon the faculty member's demonstrated experience in the use of educational technologies, but, more importantly, the faculty member's plans for an innovative application of technology to a current course offering at Moraine Valley. All of this is to be outlined in the letter of application. As there is a finite amount of funding for this program, we will be selective in identifying team members. Letters of interest should address these five points:

  • Applicant background information (discipline/years of service, etc.)

  • Past or present technology-based innovations.

  • Evidence of a commitment to a new application of technology.

  • An outline of a proposed technology-based innovation, including in what way(s) a particular course will be enhanced.

  • An outline of the methodology to be used to produce the enhancements envisioned.

  • An estimate of the number of hours required for project completion. Contact Tom Sullivan, Teaching/Learning Team Technology Advisor, for assistance in making this estimate.

Expected Outcomes
A fall 2000 launch of the technology-enhanced courses is anticipated. If you are selected to participate in the Applied Instructional Technology Program, you will be expected to accomplish the following:

  • Meet weekly with the members of the team (faculty and support personnel) for development and problem-solving activities;

  • Assist in filing regular status repots, as well as a final report at the conclusion of the project;

  • Work diligently, alone or in the team setting, to have materials ready for review by July 1, 2000;

  • Be available during the summer to troubleshoot any problems identified in the pilot review;

  • Serve as mentors to others who are interested in undertaking these activities in the future; and

  • Prepare project results for publication and make presentations for CFPE, League for Innovation, and other conferences, as determined.

Timeline
The 2000 Applied Educational Technology Program will begin officially with the 2000 spring semester and will proceed according to the following timetable:

December 1999�Selection of the team. Faculty selected to participate in this project will be informed by December 15, 1999. 

February 2000�The selected faculty will be required to attend an orientation to the program on January 14, 2000.

Spring 2000 Semester�The fun begins! The creative process will take over, and the team members will enhance their development plans, develop prototypes, further revise plans, and complete development.

Faculty will work creatively and collaboratively in developing a technology-enriched syllabus. Technical and instructional design support will be provided, as needed, by staff in the Division of Information Technology.

Summer 2000�Upon review of the status reports provided in May, and following meeting with the Academic Affairs Council, the team members will continue their work through the summer, as needed. 

July 2000�Demonstration of fully developed technological enhancements will be presented to joint session of Program participants and the Academic Affairs Council.

Fall 2000�Course delivery using enhanced technology applications will be implemented.

Compensation
Each faculty member who is selected for the program team will receive a stipend proportional to the effort made and results achieved.

Selection Process
Letters of interest are due by Dec. 6, 1999, to Dr. Kickels, vice president of Academic Affairs. The faculty who are selected to participate in this project will be informed by December 15, 1999. The committee evaluating Learning Challenge proposals includes a representative from the Center for Faculty and Program Excellence, Dr. Brodie, Dr. Hammersberg, Dr. Fraites, Asst. VP Grund, Dean Rhoades, Mr. Leturno, Mr. Tom Sullivan, and Dr. Kickels.

Questions
If you would like further information about the Applied Instructional Technology Program, please contact Diane Grund, ext. 5290, or Tom Sullivan, ext. 5231.


Learning College Challenge Grants Critical Literacy�VIII
Moraine Valley Community College
Division of Academic Affairs�Vision 2000
Grant Resource Guide
1999-2000 Academic Year

Background
Beginning in fall 1988 and continuing through spring 1995, the Division of Academic Affairs invited faculty to participate annually in a year-long Critical Literacy team. Approximately 90 faculty, full-time and adjunct, participated in the seven teams. The Critical Literacy project was followed by the Learning Challenge Grant Program, which was introduced in the 1996-97 academic year to facilitate progress toward the division's Vision 2000 planning effort. Vision 2000 further articulated the division's commitment to critical literacy by providing support for creative curriculum efforts and innovative teaching/learning approaches.

The Learning Challenge Grant Program, which was awarded the 1998 Award for Excellence in Learning-Centered Instruction by the Illinois Community College Board in October 1998, encourages further innovation by faculty in all subject areas and invites faculty to infuse critical literacy and interactive approaches into learning modules and courses. The division continues to be committed to critical literacy, and we want to improve these skills in our students. As a result, the 1999-2000 Learning Challenge Grant includes critical literacy.

The purpose of implementing critical literacy in a course is to create a bridge between theory and practice. Critical literacy is characterized by an emphasis on teaching and course design linked to various types of learning theories. In particular, most educators place a heavy emphasis on reading, writing, learning styles and strategies, critical thinking, and collaborative learning.

Because there are few opportunities for faculty in the daily business of teaching to have a chance to pause and consider incorporating critical literacy elements into the curriculum, the Division of Academic Affairs wishes to support faculty to develop these components for their courses, and to share successful approaches with other faculty.

Invitation
The Division of Academic Affairs wishes to provide faculty with the opportunity to develop and implement strategies designed to improve critical literacy skills in our students. You are invited to become a member of the 2000 Critical Literacy Project Team, which will be comprised of a select number of Moraine Valley faculty members who will be chosen to incorporate critical literacy components into an existing course. This invitation is open to faculty who have not previously participated in one of the seven Critical Literacy teams. A coordinator for this project will be selected from the past participants.

While all courses will be considered for this project, the Selection Committee strongly encourages proposals for critical literacy applications in courses that satisfy the Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI) general education core, IAI baccalaureate transfer, and courses that impact a large number of students seeking career A.A.S. degrees or certificates.

Participation
Faculty who wish to participate in this project are asked to present a letter of interest (two-page maximum) to the vice president of Academic Affairs. Deadline: Dec. 6, 1999. The selection criteria for this project will be based upon the faculty member's demonstrated commitment/experience in the use of critical literacy concepts to be outlined in his/her letter of interest. As there will be only a limited number of faculty chosen for this project, we will be selective in identifying team members. Letters of interest should respond to the following areas: 

  • Applicant background information (discipline/years of service, etc.)

  • Evidence of past or current instructional innovations

  • Evidence of interest in and qualifications for this project

  • Proposed course(s) for incorporation of critical literacy strategies

Expected Outcomes
Critical literacy course strategies will be developed for implementation in the fall 2000 semester. If you decide to apply for participation in the 2000 Critical Literacy Project, you will be expected to accomplish the following:

  • Meet weekly with the members of the team (project coordinators and faculty) to devise specific critical literacy strategies and classroom techniques;

  • Assist in filling regular status reports, as well as a final report at the conclusion of the project;

  • Work with the team to have materials ready for review by January 2001;

  • Serve as mentors to faculty who are interested in pursuing these activities in the future; and

  • Prepare for publication the Critical Literacy Project results and make presentations for the Center for Faculty and Program Excellence and at conferences, as determined.

Timeline
The 2000 Critical Literacy Project will officially begin with the 2000 spring semester and will proceed according to the following timetable:

December 1999Selection of the team will occur. Faculty selected to participate in this project will be informed by December 15, 1999.

February 2000The team will be required to attend an orientation to the project in

February 2000 (the exact day will be announced at a later time).

Spring and Fall 2000 SemestersTeam members, working with the project coordinators, will investigate and develop specific strategies for incorporating critical literacy skills into existing courses. Faculty will work creatively and collaboratively. Technical and instructional design support, if needed, will be provided. Each team member will submit a status report in May 2000 and in December 2000. 

Spring 2001Demonstration of course-specific critical literacy strategies will be given to the Academic Affairs Council.

Spring 2001Implementation of critical literacy strategies into selected courses.

Fall 2001Evaluation of critical literacy strategies.

Compensation
Each faculty member who is selected for the 2000 Critical Literacy Project team will receive a stipend in the amount of $750 for each semester of participation.

Selection Process
Letters of interest are due by December 6, 1999, to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. The faculty members who are selected to participate in this project will be informed by December 15, 1999. The committee evaluating Learning Challenge proposals includes a representative from the Center for Faculty & Program Excellence, Dr. Brodie, Dr. Fraites, Asst. VP Grund, Dr. Hammersberg, Dean Rhoades, Mr. Seaney, and Dr. Kickels.

Questions
If you would like further information about the Critical Literacy Learning Challenge please contact Diane Grund at ext. 5290.


Learning College Challenge Grants Virtual College - III
Moraine Valley Community College 
Division of Academic Affairs - Vision 2000
Grant Resource Guide
1999-2000 Academic Year

Background
Challenged by Terry O'Banion, the keynote speaker at Moraine Valley Community College's August 1996 inservice program, the college's faculty and staff initiated dialogue focused on increasing innovation and interactivity in the teaching and learning process. In October 1996, the vice president of Academic Affairs introduced the Vision 2000 initiative, which further articulated the college's commitment to the Learning College Model as a learner-centered approach to providing greater opportunities for empowering students to navigate their own learning paths. The Vision 2000 goal was to provide support for the creative curriculum delivery efforts that were already in evidence among faculty and departments, to encourage further innovation by faculty in all subject areas, and to invite faculty to infuse technology into learning modules and courses.

The Learning Challenge Grant Program was implemented at Moraine Valley Community College in the 1996-97 academic year to facilitate progress toward the Vision 2000 efforts. The program awards support, resources and funding to individual faculty members and/or teams for the purpose of developing creative and compelling approaches to the teaching and learning process. The results of the Learning Challenge Grant Program have been exciting and substantive, including the introduction in the fall of 1998 of Moraine Valley's Virtual College.

With the implementation of the Virtual College in the fall 1998 semester, Moraine Valley joined the vanguard of institutions providing Internet-based instruction to students. At that time, eight courses developed by Moraine Valley faculty went online and were taught via the Internet.

Invitation
The Division of Academic Affairs is eager to continue its support of learning-centered instruction and to expand the use of Internet technology for teaching and learning. For these reasons the focus of the Learning Challenges for 2000 is on the development of web-based courses. You are invited to become a member of the 2000 Virtual College Project team, which will be comprised of a select number of Moraine Valley faculty members who will be chosen to convert an existing course for delivery via the campus network and/or the Internet.

Our goal is to provide complete on-line degrees/certificates. While all courses will be considered for this project, the Selection Committee strongly encourages proposals for courses that satisfy the Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI) general education core, IAI baccalaureate transfer, and courses that impact a large number of students seeking career A.A.S. degrees or certificates.

Participation
Faculty anxious to participate in this project are asked to present a letter of interest (two-page maximum) to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. Deadline: December 6, 1999. The selection criteria for this project will be based upon the faculty member's demonstrated experience in the use of instructional and information technologies to be outlined in his/her letter of interest. As there are only a certain number of spaces available for this project, we wil be selective in identifying team members. Letters of interest should address these four points:

  • Applicant background information (discipline/years of service, etc.)

  • Evidence of past or current instructional innovations or projects.

  • Evidence of interest in and qualifications for this project.

  • Proposed course recommended for online conversion.

Expected Outcomes
A fall 2000 online launch of these courses is anticipated. If you are selected to participate in the Virtual College Project, you will be expected to accomplish the following:

  • Meet weekly with the members of the team (faculty and support personnel) for development and problem-solving activities;

  • Assist in filing regular status reports, as well as a final report at the conclusion of the project; 

  • Work with the team to have materials ready for review by July 1, 1999;

  • Be available during the summer to troubleshoot any problems identified in the pilot review;

  • Serve as mentors to others who are interested in undertaking these activities in the future; and

  • Prepare project results for publication and make presentations for Center for Faculty and Program, League for Innovation, and other conferences, as determined.

Timeline
The 2000 Virtual College Project will officially begin with the 2000 semester and will proceed according to the following timetable:

December 1999�Selection of the team will occur. Faculty selected to participate in this project will be informed by December 15, 1999.

January 2000�The team will be required to attend an orientation to the project on January 14, 2000.

Spring 2000 Semester�The fun begins! The creative process will take over, and the team members will determine the approaches to accomplish the conversion of existing courses for online delivery.

Faculty will work creatively and collaboratively in developing the online courses. Technical and instructional design support will be provided, as needed by staff, in the Division of Information Technology.

Summer 2000�Upon review of the status reports provided in April, and following meetings with the Academic Affairs Council, the team members will continue their work through the summer as needed.

July 2000�Demonstration of course to Virtual College Project team members and the Academic Affairs Council.

Fall 2000�The online courses will be offered at Moraine Valley College.

Compensation
Each faculty member who is selected for the Virtual College Project team will receive release time or stipend equivalent to the ECH of the course being converted. 

Selection Process
Letters of interest are due by Dec. 6, 1999 to Dr. Kickels, vice president of Academic Affairs. The faculty who are selected to participate in this project will be informed by Dec. 15, 1999. The committee evaluating Learning Challenge proposals includes a representative from the Center for Faculty and Program Excellence, Dr. Brodie, Dr. Hammersberg, Dr. Fraites, Asst. VP Grund, Dean Rhoades, Mr. Leturno, Mr. Sullivan, Teaching/Learning Team, and Dr. Kickels.

Questions
If you would like further information about the Virtual College Learning Challenge, please contact Diane Grund at ext. 5290 or Tom Sullivan at ext. 5231.