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Electrical Troubleshooting
Certificate
Curriculum code 1452

Course Requirements


This program prepares students for a career as a heating, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanic or service representative.

Nature of WorkElectrical equipment and electronic equipment are two distinct types of industrial equipment, although much equipment contains both electrical and electronic components. In general, electrical portions provide the power for the equipment, while electronic components control the device, although many types of equipment still are controlled with electrical devices. Electronic sensors monitor the equipment and the manufacturing process, providing feedback to the programmable logic control (PLC), which controls the equipment. The PLC processes the information provided by the sensors and makes adjustments to optimize output. To adjust the output, the PLC sends signals to the electrical, hydraulic, and pneumatic devices that power the machine-changing feed rates, pressures, and other variables in the manufacturing process. Many installers and repairers, known as field technicians, travel to factories or other locations to repair equipment. These workers often have assigned areas in which they perform preventive maintenance on a regular basis. When equipment breaks down, field technicians go to a customer's site to repair the equipment. Bench technicians work in repair shops, located in factories and service centers, fixing components that cannot be repaired on the factory floor.

Related Job Titles—Workers in other occupations who install and repair electronic equipment include broadcast and sound technicians and radio operators; computer, automated teller, and office machine repairers; electronic home entertainment equipment installers and repairers; and radio and telecommunications equipment installers and repairers. Industrial machinery mechanics and maintenance workers also install, maintain and repair industrial machinery.

Related ProgramsComputer/Electronics Controls Tech A.A.S. (63 credit hours), Electronics Technician Certificate (18 credit hours), Electrical Controls Technician (42 credit hours).

Employment OutlookJob opportunities should be best for applicants with a thorough knowledge of electrical equipment and electronics, as well as individuals with repair experience. Overall employment of electrical and electronics installers and repairers is expected to grow by 5% through the year 2018, which is slower. In addition to employment growth, the need to replace workers who transfer to other occupations or leave the labor force will result in many job openings.

EarningsMedian hourly earnings of electrical and electronics repairers, commercial and industrial equipment were $23.29 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $18.40 and $28.73. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $14.39, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $33.81. In May 2008, median hourly earnings were $25.31 in the federal government and $22.46 in building equipment contractors, the industries employing the largest numbers of electrical and electronics repairers, commercial and industrial equipment.

Median hourly earnings of electrical and electronics repairers, powerhouse, substation, and relay were $29.34 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $25.68 and $33.72. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $20.91, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $38.43. In May 2008, median hourly earnings were $29.66 in electric power generation, transmission, and distribution, the industry employing the largest number of these repairers. Median hourly earnings of electrical and electronics repairers, transportation equipment were $21.37 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $16.86 and $25.73. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $13.42, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $30.32. U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2010-2011. www.bls.gov/oco/ocos206.htm

For job listings and job placement assistance, contact the Job Resource Center in the Student Services Center, S202, (708) 974-5737, www.morainevalley.edu/jrc.

 
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