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Drug and Alcohol Policies

Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act

Moraine Valley Community College Annual Notification of Drug and Alcohol Policies

As a requirement of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 [EDGAR Part 86], Moraine Valley Community College is to disseminate these policies and information to all students and employees on an annual basis. This notification’s purpose is to serve as a reminder of the standards of conduct relating to drugs and alcohol, the health risks associated with drug and alcohol abuse, the availability of support for those experiencing drug or alcohol problems, the MVCC policies related to the illegal possession, use or distribution of drugs or alcohol, and the internal sanctions and federal and state legal penalties that may result from violations. Questions concerning this policy and/or alcohol and other drug programs, interventions and policies may be directed to the Vice President of Student Development at (708) 974-5308.

Policies — Alcohol and Other Drugs

As an academic community, Moraine Valley Community College is committed to providing an environment in which learning and scholarship can flourish. The possession or use of illegal drugs, or the abuse of those that may otherwise be legally possessed, seriously affects the college environment as well as the individual potential of our students and employees. The college enforces state laws and related college policies.

The abuse of alcohol and other drugs by students, regardless of age and of location (on-campus or off-campus), is prohibited by the Code of Student Conduct. The college can, and will, impose disciplinary sanctions for violations. Students are also subject to state and federal laws. A separate policy addresses violations by college employees. See Board Policy 7286.

The college strongly encourages students and employees to voluntarily obtain assistance for dependency or abuse problem before such behavior results in an arrest and/or disciplinary referral, which might result in their separation from the institution.

The use of or addiction to alcohol, marijuana, or controlled substances is not considered an excuse for violations of the Code of Student Conduct or employee expectations and will not be a mitigating factor in the application of appropriate disciplinary sanctions for such violations.

Help is available both on campus and within the community for students and employees who are dependent on or who abuse the use of alcohol or other drugs. The Counseling and Career Development Center, the Employee Assistance Program, and other professional agencies will maintain the confidentiality of persons seeking help for personal dependency and will not report them to institutional or state authorities.

Student Policies and Sanctions

All students who violate the college’s alcohol and drug policies, as defined in the Code of Student Conduct, will face disciplinary sanctions. See table below.

Students whose use of alcohol or drugs results in harm or the threat of harm to themselves or others, or to property, regardless of the location of the incident, may face disciplinary action by the college up to and including expulsion and/or arrest.

Testing for the presences of illegal substances may be a sanction imposed by the college for violations of drug-related policies. In these cases, students will be required to get drug-tested by a medical professional at the student’s expense as often as deemed necessary by the college. The student will be required to submit results of the tests to the appropriate student conduct administrator. Any student whose test results indicate continued drug use may face additional disciplinary action by the college up to and including expulsion.

Commonly Imposed Disciplinary Sanctions For On-Campus Policy Violations

Code of Student Conduct
Code Section Code Description Typical Sanctions —
Minor Violation
Typical Sanctions —
Major Violation
IV.12 Use, possession, manufacturing or distribution of any controlled substance, drug, or other chemical substance except as expressly permitted by law, or possession of drug paraphernalia. Warning, parental notification, educational sanctions (workshop attendance, research/reflection papers), disciplinary probation Warning, parental notification, educational sanctions (workshop attendance, research/reflection papers), disciplinary probation, counseling referral/ substance abuse assessment, drug testing, loss of privileges, withdrawal, suspension, expulsion
IV.13 Use, possession, manufacturing, distribution or being under the influence of alcoholic beverages (except as expressly permitted by college regulations), as well as public intoxication. Alcoholic beverages may not, in any circumstance, be used by, possessed by or distributed to any person under twenty-one (21) years of age. Warning, parental notification, educational sanctions (workshop attendance, research/reflection papers), disciplinary probation Warning, parental notification, educational sanctions (workshop attendance, research/reflection papers), disciplinary probation, counseling referral/ substance abuse assessment, loss of privileges, withdrawal, suspension, expulsion

As members of the college community, students are also subject to state and federal law. Arrest and prosecution by the Moraine Valley Police Department for alleged violations of criminal law may result from the same incident for which the college imposes disciplinary sanctions.

Employee Policies and Sanctions

From Board Policy 7286:

The College is committed to maintaining a work place that is free from the effects of drug and alcohol use. To promote this goal, employees are required to report to work in appropriate mental and physical condition to perform their jobs in a satisfactory manner.

In accordance with the Federal Drug-Free Work Place Act of 1988, College employees shall not manufacture, distribute, dispense, possess or use illicit drugs, unauthorized prescription drugs, alcohol or controlled substances on the premises of any College building or facility (unless authorized), in College-owned vehicles, or during work hours. Likewise, employees also are prohibited from being under the influence of illegal drugs, controlled substances, unauthorized prescription drugs or alcohol on the premises of any College building or facility (unless authorized), in College-owned vehicles, or during work hours. Compliance with this policy is a condition of employment. Sanctions for violation of this policy extend to and include dismissal and referral for prosecution consistent with applicable local, state and federal law.

This policy does not apply to the lawful use of prescription drugs under the supervision of a licensed healthcare professional and within the limits of a valid prescription. An employee who has been prescribed drugs or who is taking over-the-counter medications that come in containers with warnings about drowsiness or interference with the ability to operate machinery or drive safely, is required, however, to consult with his or her doctor or pharmacist about the medication’s effect on the employee’s ability to perform his or her job safely, and to immediately disclose to his or her supervisor any medication-related work restrictions. Employees should not, however, disclose the type of drugs they have been prescribed or the underlying medical conditions, impairments or disabilities unless specifically directed to do so by their doctors or asked to do so by the College Human Resources Director or his/her Designee.

Pre-Employment Testing
Applicants for any College position may be required to submit to and pass a drug test as a condition of employment, given to applicants with conditional offers of employment. Applicants shall be disqualified from employment with the College for refusal to submit to a required drug test, or for a confirmed positive drug test.

Drug Testing of Employees
It is the policy of the College to conduct drug/alcohol testing where it has a reasonable suspicion that an employee may be under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs or other controlled substances. In addition, any employee who is reasonably believed to have caused or contributed to an accident which resulted in personal injury requiring medical treatment away from the scene of the accident, or which disabled a piece of equipment or at the discretion of the Supervisor following an accident shall be tested for alcohol, illegal drugs or other controlled substances.

Employees subject to D.O.T. testing shall be tested in accordance with D.O.T. regulations in addition to the testing and discipline provisions of this policy. Refusal to submit to testing will result in disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal.

In the event the employee is so seriously injured that he/she cannot provide a sample of urine or breath at the time of the accident, the employee must provide necessary authorization to the College to obtain hospital records or other documents that would indicate whether or not there was the presence of controlled substances or alcohol in the employee's system at the time of the accident. Failure to comply with the authorization will result in the termination of employment.

As members of the college community, employees are also subject to state and federal law. Arrest and prosecution by the Moraine Valley Police Department for alleged violations of criminal law may result from the same incident for which the college imposes disciplinary sanctions.

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Illinois Sanctions for Violation of Alcohol Control Statutes

235 Illinois Compiled Statutes 5/6-20

  1. Class A Misdemeanor - unlawful use of a identification card
  2. Class 4 Felony - fictitious or unlawfully altered identification card
  3. Class 4 Felony - fraudulent identification card
  4. Class B Misdemeanor to possess or sell alcohol if you are under 21.*
  5. Class A Misdemeanor to sell, give, or deliver alcohol to individuals under 21 years of age. Local ordinances may also be enforced.

Class A Misdemeanors are punishable with a fine of $1 to $2,500 and up to 1 year in the county jail.
Class B Misdemeanors are punishable with a fine of $1 to $1,500 and up to 6 months in the county jail.

  • These violations may also result in one's driver's license being administratively revoked or suspended by the Illinois Secretary of State's office.

Illinois Sanctions for Driving Under The Influence

625 Illinois Compiled Statutes 5/11-501

  1. Driving while under the influence of alcohol, other drug or drugs, intoxicating compound or compounds or any combination thereof.
    a. First Conviction
    i. Minimum of one-year loss of full driving privileges
    ii. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
    iii. Maximum fine of $2,500

    b. Second Conviction
    i. Minimum five-year loss of full driving privileges for a second conviction in a 20-year period
    ii. Mandatory five days imprisonment or 240 hours of community service
    iii. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
    iv. Maximum fine of $2,5000

    c. Third Conviction – Class 2 Felony
    i. Minimum ten-year loss of full driving privileges
    ii. Mandatory 18-30 month periodic imprisonment
    iii. Possible imprisonment for up to seven years
    iv. Maximum fine of $25,000

    d. Aggravated DUI – Class 4 Felony (following a crash resulting in great bodily harm or permanent disfigurement)
    i. Minimum of one-year loss of full driving privileges
    ii. Mandatory ten days imprisonment or 480 hours of community service
    iii. Possible imprisonment for up to twelve years
    iv. Maximum fine of $25,000
  2.  Other alcohol offenses

    a. Providing alcohol to a person under age 21
    i. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
    ii. Maximum fine of $2,500

    b. Illegal transportation of an alcoholic beverage
    i. Maximum fine of $1,000
    ii. Point-assigned violation will be entered on drivers record
    iii. Driver’s license suspension for a second conviction in a 12 month period

    c. Knowingly permitting a driver under the influence to operate a vehicle
    i. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
    ii. Maximum fine of $2,500

    d. Summary Suspension

    i. First offense
         1. A chemical test indication a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory six-month driver’s
             license suspension
         2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a twelve-month suspension

    ii. Subsequent offenses
         1. A chemical test indicating a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory one-year driver’s
            license suspension
    2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a three-year license suspension

Illinois Penalties For Drinking and Driving Under Age 21

  1. Driving while under the influence of alcohol, other drug or drugs, intoxicating compound or compounds or any combination thereof

    a. First Conviction

    i. Minimum of two-year loss of full driving privileges
    ii. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
    iii. Maximum fine of $2,500

    b. Second Conviction
    i. Minimum five-year loss of full driving privileges for a second conviction in a 20-year period
    ii. Mandatory five days imprisonment or 240 hours of community service
    iii. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
    iv. Maximum fine of $2,5000

    c. Third Conviction – Class 2 Felony
    i. Minimum ten-year loss of full driving privileges
    ii. Mandatory 18-30 month periodic imprisonment
    iii. Possible imprisonment for up to seven years
    iv. Maximum fine of $25,000

    d. Aggravated DUI – Class 4 Felony (following a crash resulting in great bodily harm or permanent disfigurement)
    i. Minimum of one-year loss of full driving privileges
    ii. Possible imprisonment for up to twelve years
    iii. Maximum fine of $25,000
  2. Other alcohol offenses

    e. Illegal transportation of an alcoholic beverage
    i. Maximum fine of $1,000
    ii. Driver’s license suspended for first conviction
    iii. Driver’s license revoked for a second conviction

    f. Summary Suspension
    i. First offense
         1. A chemical test indication a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory six-month driver’s
             license suspension
         2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a twelve-month suspension

    ii. Subsequent offenses
         1. A chemical test indicating a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory one-year driver’s
             license suspension
         2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a three-year license suspension
  3. The Zero Tolerance Law provides that minors can have their driving privileges suspended even if they're not intoxicated at the .08 level. The following table shows the length of time your driving privileges may be suspended under the Zero Tolerance Law (for BAC of .01 or greater) and DUI Laws (for BAC of .08 or greater). The loss of driving privileges is greater if you refuse to take a sobriety test.
  Under Zero Tolerance Law Under DUI Laws
    If test refused   If test refused
1st violation 3 months 36 months 6 months 12 months
2nd violation 1 year 2 yearss 1 year 3 years

Effect on Driving Record

  1. Zero tolerance (BAC of .01 or greater) – except during suspension period, not on public driving record as long as there is no subsequent suspension.
  2. DUI conviction (BAC of .08 or greater) – Permanently on public driving record

*Under certain conditions, you may be charged with DUI even though your BAC is below .08.
Except during suspension period, violation is not on public driving record as long as there is no subsequent suspension permanently on public driving record.

State of Illinois Statutory Provisions for Illegal Drugs Manufacture or Delivery

  Manufacture or Delivery (720 Illinois Compiled Statutes 570/401) Possession (720 ILCS 570/402)
Illegal Drugs Class X Felony Class 1 Felony Class 2 Felony Class 3 Felony Class 1 Felony Class 4 Felony
  6 to 30 years not more than $500,000 fine 4 to 15 years not more than $250,000 fine 3 to 7 years not more than $200,000 fine 2 to 5 years not more than $150,000 fine 4 to 15 years not more than $20,000 fine 1 to 4 years not more than $15,000 fine
Heroin 15 grams or more 10-14 grams 10 grams or less   15 grams or more less than 15 grams
Cocaine 15 grams or more 1-14 grams 1 gram or less   15 grams or more less than 15 grams
Morphine 15 grams or more 10-14 grams 10 grams or less   15 grams or more less than 15 grams
Peyote 200 grams or more 50-199 grams   50 grams or less 200 grams or more less than 200 grams
Barbiturates 200 grams or more 50-199 grams   50 grams or less 200 grams or more less than 200 grams
Amphetamines 200 grams or more 50-199 grams   50 grams or less 200 grams or more less than 200 grams
Lysergic Acid (LSD) 15 grams or more 5 to 14 grams or hits   5 grams or less 15 grams or more less than 15 grams
Petazocine 30 grams or more 10 to 29 grams   10 grams or less 30 grams or more less than 30 grams
Methaqualone 30 grams or more 10 to 29 grams   10 grams or less 30 grams or more less than 30 grams
Phencyclidine 30 grams or more 10 to 29 grams   30 grams or less 30 grams or more less than 30 grams
Ketamine 30 grams or more 11 to 30 grams   less than 10 grams 30 grams or more less than 30 grams
GHB 200 grams or more 50 to 200 grams   less than 50 grams 200 grams or more less than 200 grams
Ecstasy 200 grams or more 50 to 199 grams   50 grams or less 200 grams or more less than 200 grams

Note: Second Offense, double jail sentence and fine. This chart gives examples of the penalties which may be imposed on individuals convicted of drug possession, manufacturing, or delivery.

Marijuana Sale or Delivery (720 Illinois Compiled Statutes 550/5)
Class B Misdemeanor: 2.5 grams or less, $500 fine and/or six months in jail
Class A Misdemeanor: 2.5-10 grams or less, $1,000 fine and/or one year in jail
Class 4 Felony: between 10-30 grams, 1-3 years in jail and/or $10,000 fine
Class 3 Felony: between 30-500 grams, 2-5 years in jail and/or fine not to exceed $50,000
Class 2 Felony: 500 or more grams, 3-7 years in jail and/or fine not to exceed $100,000

Possession (720 Illinois compiled Statutes 550/4)
Class C Misdemeanor: 2.5 grams or less, $500 fine and/or thirty days in jail
Class B Misdemeanor: between 2.5-10 grams, $500 fine and/or six months in jail
Class A Misdemeanor: between 10-30 grams, $1,000 fine and/or one year in jail
Class 4 Felony: between 30-500 grams, 1-3 years in jail and/or $10,000 fine
Class 3 Felony: over 500 grams, 2-5 years in jail and/or fine not to exceed $50,000

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Federal Drug Laws

The possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs is prohibited by federal law. Strict penalties are enforced for drug convictions, including mandatory prison terms for many offenses. The following information, although not complete, is an overview of federal penalties for first convictions. All penalties are doubled for any subsequent drug conviction.

Denial of Federal Aid (20 USC 1091)
Under the Higher Education Act of 1998, students convicted under federal or state law for the sale or possession of drugs will have their federal financial aid eligibility suspended. This includes all federal grants, loans, federal work study programs, and more. Students convicted of drug possession will be ineligible for one year from the date of the conviction of the first offense, two years for the second offense, and indefinitely for the third offense. Students convicted of selling drugs will be ineligible for two years from the date of the first conviction, and indefinitely for the second offense. Those who lose eligibility can regain eligibility by successfully completing an approved drug rehabilitation program.

Forfeiture of Personal Property and Real Estate (21 USC 853)
Any person convicted of a federal drug offense punishable by more than one year in prison shall forfeit to the United States any personal or real property related to the violation, including houses, cars, and other personal belongings. A warrant of seizure is issued and property is seized at the time an individual is arrested on charges that may result in forfeiture.

Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties (21 USC 841)
Penalties for federal drug trafficking convictions vary according to the quantity of the controlled substance involved in the transaction. The following list is a sample of the range and severity of federal penalties imposed for first convictions. Penalties for subsequent convictions are twice as severe.

If death or serious bodily injury result from the use of a controlled substance which has been illegally distributed, the person convicted on federal charges of distributing the substance faces mandatory life sentence and fines ranging up to $8 million.

Persons convicted on federal charges of drug trafficking within 1,000 feet of a University (21 USC 845a) face penalties of prison terms and fines which are twice as high as the regular penalties for the offense, with a mandatory prison sentence of at least 1 year.

Drug/Substance Amount Penalty — 1st Conviction
Barbiturates Any amount Up to 5 years prison. Fine up to $250,000
Cocaine 5 kgs. or more Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million
Less than 100 grams 10-63 months prison. Fine up to $1 million
Crack Cocaine 50 grams or more Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million
5-49 grams Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million
5 grams or less 10-63 months prison. Fine up to $1 million
Ecstasy Any amount Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million. 3 years of supervised releases (following prison)
GHB Any amount Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million. 3 years of supervised releases (following prison)
Hashish 10-100 kg Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million.
10 kg or less Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000
Hash Oil 1-100 kg Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million.
1 kg or less Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000
Heroin 1 kg or more Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million
100-999 grams Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million
100 grams or less 10-63 months prison. Fine up to $1 million
Ketamine Any amount Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000. 2 years supervised release
LSD 10 grams or more Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million
1-10 grams Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million
Marijuana 1000 kg or more Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million
100-999 kg Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million
50-99 kg Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million
50 kg or less Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000
Methamphetamine 50 grams or more Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million
10-49 grams Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million
10 grams or less 10-21 months prison. Fine up to $1 million
PCP 100 grams or more Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million
10-99 grams Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million
10 grams or less 10-21 months prison. Fine up to $1 million
Rohypnol 1 gram or more Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million
less than 30 mgs Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000

Federal Drug Possession Penalties (21 USC 844)

Persons convicted on Federal charges of possessing any controlled substance face penalties of up to 1 year in prison and a mandatory fine of no less than $1,000 up to a maximum of $100,000. Second convictions are punishable by not less than 15 days but not more than 2 years in prison and a minimum fine of $2,500. Subsequent convictions are punishable by not less than 90 days but not more than 3 years in prison and a minimum fine of $5,000. Possession of drug paraphernalia is punishable by a minimum fine of $750.

Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine impose a mandatory prison term of not less than 5 years but not more than 20 years and a fine up to $250,000, or both if:

  1. It is a first conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 5 grams;
  2. It is a second conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 3 grams;
  3. It is a third or subsequent crack conviction and the amount exceeds 1 gram.

Civil penalties of up to $10,000 may also be imposed for possession of small amounts of controlled substances, whether or not criminal prosecution is pursued.

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Counseling and Treatment

The Moraine Valley Community College Counseling and Career Development Center (CCDC) provides educational, career and human development services to students. (708) 974-5722. Students may be referred through the Counseling Center to other treatment programs for more intensive treatment.

The college provides an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) for employees that offers a confidential, cost free referral and assessment service, 24 hours a day, for both employees and their family members. The EAP assists employees in dealing with personal problems including substance abuse, emotional, mental health, family, marital, financial, and legal problems. (From Board Policy 7286)

Resources

On-Campus Resources
Counseling and Career Development Center (708)974-5722
www.morainevalley.edu/counseling
Code of Conduct Office (708)974-5390
www.morainevalley.edu/conduct
Moraine Valley Police Department (708)974-5555
www.morainevalley.edu/police
Dean of Student Services (708) 974-5360
Vice President of Student Development (708)974-5308
Employee Assistance Program Information:
Human Resources Office
(708)974-3374
www.morainevalley.edu/humanresources
Off-Campus Resources
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Treatment Resources (800) 662-HELP (4357)
www.samhsa.gov/treatment/index.aspx
National Substance Abuse Index: Illinois (877) 340-0184 (24 Hour Helpline)
http://nationalsubstanceabuseindex.org/illinois/facilities.php
Adult Children of Alcoholics www.adultchildren.org (312) 346-1475
Alcoholics Anonymous: Chicago www.chicagoaa.org(773) 777-4442
Families Anonymous: Chicago www.familiesanonymous.org
Al-Anon and Alateen: North Illinois (312) 409-7245
www.al-anon.alateen.org
Palos Community Hospital Free, confidential assessments are available: (708) 460-2721 www.paloscommunityhospital.org/services/behavioral-health/programs/alcohol-treatment-program/
Palos Hills Police Department – Emergency 911

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Prevention and Education

The Counseling and Career Development Center and the Moraine Valley Police Department periodically provide educational programs to students on alcohol and drug use.

From time to time during the academic year, the College may sponsor workshops or seminars and may distribute informational materials dealing with the dangers of drug abuse. Employees are encouraged to attend these seminars and to read the informational materials provided. Additional information regarding the dangers and health risks of alcoholic beverages and illegal chemical substances is available in Human Resources, the Counseling Center, and the Library.

As mandated by the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act, this notification is distributed to all students and employees on an annual basis, and during every even year, a biennial review of the comprehensive alcohol and other drug program is conducted. For more information concerning current programs, interventions and policies, contact the Vice President of Student Development.

Health Risks of Commonly Abused Substances
Substance Nicknames/
Slang Terms
Short Term Effects Long Term Effects
Alcohol   slurred speech, drowsiness, headaches, impaired judgment, decreased perception and coordination, distorted vision and hearing, vomiting, breathing difficulties, unconsciousness, coma, blackouts toxic psychosis, physical dependence, neurological and liver damage, fetal alcohol syndrome, vitamin B1 deficiency, sexual problems, cancer, physical dependence
Amphetamines uppers, speed, meth, crack, crystal, ice, pep pills increased heart rate, increased blood pressure, dry mouth, loss of appetite, restlessness, irritability, anxiety delusions, hallucinations, heart problems, hypertension, irritability, insomnia, toxic psychosis, physical dependence
Barbiturates and Tranquilizers barbs, bluebirds, blues, yellow jackets, red devils, roofies, rohypnol, ruffies, tranqs, mickey, flying v's slurred speech, muscle relaxation, dizziness, decreased motor control severe withdrawal symptoms, possible convulsions, toxic psychosis, depression, physical dependence
Cocaine coke, cracks, snow, powder, blow, rock loss of appetite, increased blood pressure and heart rate, contracted blood vessels, nausea, hyper-stimulation anxiety, paranoia, increased hostility, increased rate of breathing, muscle spasms and convulsions, dilated pupils, disturbed sleep depression, weight loss, high blood pressure, seizure, heart attack, stroke, hypertension, hallucinations, psychosis, chronic cough, nasal passage injury, kidney, liver and lung damage
Gamma Hydroxy Butyrate GHB, liquid B, liquid X, liquid ecstasy, G, georgia homeboy, grievous bodily harm euphoria, decreased inhibitions, drowsiness, sleep, decreased body temperature, decreased heart rate, decreased blood pressure memory loss, depression, severe withdrawal symptoms, physical dependence, psychological dependence
Heroin H, junk, smack, horse, skag euphoria, flushing of the skin, dry mouth, “heavy” arms and legs, slowed breathing, muscular weakness constipation, loss of appetite, lethargy, weakening of the immune system, respiratory (breathing) illnesses, muscular weakness, partial paralysis, coma, physical dependence, psychological dependence
Ketamine K, super K, special K dream-like states, hallucinations, impaired attention and memory, delirium, impaired motor function, high blood pressure, depression Urinary tract and bladder problems, abdominal pain, major convulsions, muscle rigidity , increased confusion, increased depression, physical dependence, psychological dependence
LSD acid, stamps, dots, blotter, A-bombs dilated pupils, change in body temperature, blood pressure and heart rate, sweating, chills, loss of appetite, decreased sleep, tremors, changes in visual acuity, mood changes may intensify existing psychosis, panic reactions, can interfere with psychological adjustment and social functioning, insomnia, physical dependence, psychological dependence
MDMA ecstasy, XTC, adam, X, rolls, pills, Molly impaired judgment, confusion, confusion, blurred vision, teeth clenching, depression, anxiety, paranoia, sleep problems, muscle tension same as LSD, sleeplessness, nausea, confusion, increased blood pressure, sweating , depression, anxiety, memory loss kidney failure, cardiovascular problems, convulsions, death, physical dependence, psychological dependence
Marijuana/Cannabis pot, grass, dope, weed, joint, bud, reefer, doobie, roach sensory distortion, poor coordination of movement, slowed reaction time, panic, anxiety bronchitis, conjunctivas, lethargy, shortened attention span, suppressed immune system, personality changes, cancer, psychological dependence, physical dependence possible for some
Mescaline peyote cactus nausea, vomiting, anxiety, delirium, hallucinations, increased heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature lasting physical and mental trauma, intensified existing psychosis, psychological dependence
Morphine/Opiates M, morf, duramorph, Miss Emma, monkey, roxanol, white stuff euphoria, increased body temperature, dry mouth, “heavy” feeling in arms and legs constipation, loss of appetite collapsed veins, heart infections, liver disease, depressed respiration, pneumonia and other pulmonary complications, physical dependence, psychological dependence
PCP crystal, tea, angel dust, embalming fluid, killer weed, rocket fuel, supergrass, wack, ozone shallow breathing, flushing, profuse sweating, numbness in arms and legs, decreased muscular coordination, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, delusions, paranoia, disordered thinking memory loss, difficulties with speech and thinking, depression, weight loss, psychotic behavior, violent acts, psychosis, physical dependence, psychological dependence
Psilocybin mushrooms, magic mushrooms, shrooms, caps, psilocybin and psilocyn nausea, distorted perceptions, nervousness, paranoia confusion, memory loss, shortened attention span, flashbacks may intensify existing psychosis
Steroids roids, juice increased lean muscle mass, increased strength, acne, oily skin, excess hair growth, high blood pressure Cholesterol imbalance, anger management problems, masculinization or women, breast enlargement in men, premature fusion of long bones preventing attainment of normal height, atrophy of reproductive organs, impotence, reduced fertility, stroke, hypertension, congestive heart failure, liver damage, psychological dependence

In accordance with Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, no individual shall be discriminated against on the basis of disability in the full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, or accommodations of the college. Further, no qualified individual with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of the services, programs, or activities of the college or be subjected to discrimination by the college.

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